Top 7 Famous Women In 3D Printing Industry – Part I

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Top 7 Famous Women In 3D Printing Industry – Part I
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Before start editing this article, I decided to go for community’s suggestions making some group polls on Facebook. The thing I found was a) Some people got my question wrong, relating it to a gender power struggle matter instead what it really is: a question with informative purposes. And b) there is definitely gonna be a second part of this top list article with more names on it, so if you already commented the name of your favourite famous women in 3D printing industry and yet is not on this post, wait for the next or comment it again in the comment section below.

At the end, I know it doesn’t matter the gender, there are thousand of people making good stuff with their 3D Printers, so each of them deserve some credit. This time I only chose girls working on amazing things.

LETS BEGIN CLICK NEXT BELOW! —>

7) Louise Driggers aka “Loubie” – Freelancer artist – Famous Women in 3D Printing

Louise Driggers, better know as Loubie, is a British freelance designer whose creations have turn into one of the most downloaded files in the whole 3D printing community.

She’s also better known for the “Sad Face” situation, in which 3D printing community gave their support in a massive contend for designers rights against Creative Commons License abuse.

Just for the record, file-sharing websites like Thingiverse allows artists and makers to freely share their designs in order to keep 3D printing community encouraged to do different things, but there are some sites taking advantage on the subject, just like Just3Dprint did, a marketplace on eBay who took more than 2k designs and pictures for selling purposes.

Sad face was widely discussed on Louibie’s Thingiverse profile, while out there Youtubers like 3D Printing Nerd, Maker’s Muse and Thomas Salanderer also took action and showed their support on the subject in their videos.

On February 28th, she won the “Sad Face” situation, when Ebay cleaned Just3DPrint products.

Edit: 28th Feb 2016

Looks as though eBay (or Just3Dprint) have acted – the Just3DPrint shop has no products on it. I would say this is the result of the community pulling together and supporting each other. Well done:-)

Please double-check to make sure your items have been removed.

Edit: 25th Feb 2016

Notice from eBay (I sent a DMCA notice on 17th Feb – so it’s taken just over a week to process. Given others were informed there is a week backlog, this backs that up).

Loubie’s social media contact:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/loubie_3D
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/loubie.driggers
Thingiverse: http://www.thingiverse.com/loubie
Website: http://www.southquay3d.com

6) Jessica Rosenkrantz  – Co-Founder at Nervous System – Famous Women in 3D Printing

Jessica Rosenkrantz - Famous Women in 3D Printing
Jessica Rosenkrantz

Jessica Rosenkrantz is an artist, designer, and programmer  graduated from the MIT and Harvard Graduate School of Design. She holds degrees in architecture and biology; in 2007, she co-founded Nervous Systems and is currently working as Creative Director.

Nervous Systems is a design studio merging science, art, and technology. Their sophisticated variety of products goes from art sculptures, jewelry and housewares, all of them created with a novel process that employs computer simulation; the programs enabling this are coded by nervous systems based on process and patterns found in nature, therefore their principal inspiration is natural phenomena.

Moreover, the company has pioneered on the application of new design technologies, including generative systems, 3D printing, and WebGL. Online design applications are enabled for the customers to co-create products in an effort to make the design more accessible.

Nervous System designs have had great media coverage, including articles on WIRED Magazine, the New York times, the Guardian, Metropolis, and Forbes.

Social media contact:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/nervous_jessica?lang=en
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nervous_jessica/?hl=en
Website: http://n-e-r-v-o-u-s.com/

5) Sherry Hus – Vice president at MakerMedia – Famous Women in 3D Printing

Famous people in 3d printing
Sherry Huss – Famous people in 3d printing

Graduated from the Ohio State University, got a degree in Business Administration in 1980. Sherry Huss is an enthusiast for the maker movement, that’s why she is co-creator of Maker Faire and the current vice president of Maker Media.

Before Maker Media, she was found holding senior management positions at MediaLive International, Key3Media, Ziff-Davis, and Softbank. Besides, Sherry has launched and successfully managed technology and consumer events such as Suns’s JavaOne, Oracle’s iDevelop, O’Reilly Medi’s Web 2.0 Summit and Dwell on Design. Even more outstanding is the fact she got more than 20 years of experience creating events on her resume.

Taking a deeper look at two of her biggest projects:

Maker Media is a global platform for connecting makers with each other with products and services through media, events, and e-commerce, while Maker Faire is a massive festival of invention and creativity of the maker movement and was created by Maker Media.

Social media contact:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SherryHuss
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sherry-huss-054b4/
Website: https://makermedia.com/

4) Neri Oxman Professor at Mediated Matter Lab, MIT – Famous Women in 3D Printing

Neri Oxman

Neri Oxman is an architect and designer graduated from the MIT.  She joined the architecture Ph.D. program in 2005 and in 210, she became an associate professor in the same university.

Two years later, in 2010, she founded Mediated Matter research Group at MIT Media Lab. The main goal was the intersection between built, natural and biological environments having their inspiration by Nature. Areas of application include architectural design, product design, fashion design and new technologies for digital construction and fabrication.

Mediated Matter projects use 3D printing as it principal fabrication process,  mixed with various 3D printing techniques and their own developed methods with the collaboration of others companies such as Stratasys.

Mediated Matter projects

2012- The Silk Pavilion,  spun by silkworms over 6,500 woven on a nylon-frame dome.

2015 – The Synthetic Apiary. A room-sized built for studying the behavior of bees in an entirely indoor environment. This was developed in order to explore how biological niches could be integrated into buildings.

Mediated Matter 3D printing projects:

2012 – first set of body-sized wearables, the collection was titled Imaginary Beings

Followed by  Anthozoa, a dress developed in collaboration with fashion designer Iris Van Herpen and materials engineer Craig Carter.

2016- the artist Bjork, gave a model of her face for the customization and production of a series of Mask’s one of these Mask’s was used on the world’s first 360° VR performance.

Mediated Matter working with MIT’s Glass Lab and researchers of the Wyss Insitute developed the G3DP project a method to 3D print glass vessels and structures, before this there were no other commercial printers who could print with glass.

The fabrication process includes molten glass poured in a fine stream with such precision suitable for consumer products and enough strength for structural and architectural elements.

Social media contact:

Website: http://web.media.mit.edu
Website: http://www.materialecology.com/

3) Marleen Vogelaar, co-founder of Shapeways – Famous Women in 3D Printing

Marleen Vogelaar Famous people in 3d printing
Marleen Vogelaar

Marleen Vogelaar is the co-founder of Shapeways, one of the biggest 3D printing marketplace services. Graduated from Master of Science on Industrial and Industrial Engineering and Management Science at Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands. She started her career as a Local Demand Manager at SCA Hygine Products and then as a Quality Manager.

Later in 2008, she and her co-founder launched Shapeways, a service’s plattform that allows customers to design their on 3D products trough rapid prototyping by sending a CAD file to the Shapeways website to 3D print.  Designers can also show their own designs to be 3D printed on demand for selling.

On 2014 Marleen Vogelaar announced she’s leaving Shapeways in good terms because she wanted to explore new ecosystems and new adventures.

a subtract from her letter.

I’ve had the best and hardest roller-coaster ride of my life and would not have wanted to miss it for the world. I experienced the hard work, fun and the excitement of building a fast growing company, taking it overseas, building the factories and growing many of the teams. So, I know I am leaving it in trusted hands. The hands that built the revolutionary upload-to-print service, the hands that were the first to introduce the Shops so designers can become entrepreneurs with the click of a mouse. And the hands that were the first to make 3D-printed metal available to anyone. This innovative spirit is in Shapeways’ DNA. I look forward to see Shapeways steam ahead and continue to define what this market is about. I hope that one day digital and physical technology can catch up with the limitless imagination of the Shapeways’s community. I cannot wait to see how Shapeways does it.

Now Marleen has a new company called “Ziel” a streamlined on-demand manufacturing & retail service for mid-sized lifestyle brands.

There, brands are allowed to create new revenue streams with eco-friendly quality and ready-to-wear, even accessories can be produced. Ziel is part of the third class of XRC Labs, the retail accelerator.

Social media contact:

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marleenvogelaar3d/
Website:  http://www.zielwear.com/

2) Limor “LadyAda” Founder of Adafruit – Famous Women in 3D Printing

Limor “LadyAda” Fried Founder of Adafruit

Limor “LadyAda” Fried studied at MIT, there she got a BS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and a Master in Engineering.   She’s a big influence in the  Open-source and DIY Community; she also participated in the first Open Source Hardware Summit and the drafting of the Open Source Hardware definition.

On 20005, Fried founded a project, Adafruit Industries, from her dorm room at MIT, though she later moved to New York. The small company designed and reselled open source electronic kits, components, and tools, for the hobbyist market. Then in 2010 the company expanded a little bit, eight employees had working and more than 3 million worth product. The market also changed from the adult hobbyist audience to focus on pre-school STEM education.

Adafruit was founded as a place for learning electronics and making the best designed products for makers. Limor personally selects, tests and approves all the tools and equipment before going to the Adafruit store.

In 2009, she was awarded the Pioneer Award by the Electronic Frontier Foundation for her participation in the open source hardware and software community.

Fried was also awarded the Most Influential Women in Technology award, in 2011, by Fast Company magazine. and became the first female engineer featured on the cover of Wired.

You can search in the website Learn Adafruit to see 3D printing projects mixed with electronics, a whole new level of DIY products.

Social media contact:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/adafruit?lang=en
Website: https://www.ladyada.net/

1)  Gina Häußge Founder of Octoprint – Famous Women in 3D Printing

Gina Häußge Founder of Octoprint

Graduated from Technische Universitat Darmstadt at Computer Science, Gina is a developer and maker enthusiast who enjoys creating software, she coded and released under Open Source philosophy Octoprint. A resume of the glorious history here:

Back time when RepRap movement became a big deal, Makers from every part of the globe started to upgrade their machines, there wasn’t much time left to see someone trying to make a stand alone developing WiFi Systems for 3D printers. Here is when Gina gets in and revolutions the way most of us 3D print now.

OctoPrint is an open source web-based host for RepRap printers. It offers a web interface to upload and print g-code files.  The beginnings of this kind of projects were Printer WebUI, a Raspberry Pi combined with a WiFi module for streaming and controlling 3d printers from distance, but it was a basic set up.

The Octoprint software was a success and that’s when problems started to appear. The community began to demand more time, updates and resources for Octoprint and Gina didn’t have enought time to satisfice all their demands.

Gina said in an interview:

“I thought I was done but then people started using it and requesting new features and suddenly I had a full-blown open source project to maintain… Maintaining and developing took more and more of my time, I also reduced to a part-time contract with my employer in September 2013 – not because OctoPrint was making me any money (hah, good one) but because I felt an obligation to what I’d started there.”

Similar companies released their own products and start the competition to won the Market: AstroPrint (built off the OctoPrint platform) or MatterControl Touch, even companies like PrintToPeer wich offers free services from the cloud via Raspberry Pi.

Even tough, Gina continues developing and improving Octoprint for all the community at the expense of here own sleep and income, for free:

Working on OctoPrint takes a lot of time and effort. The development of new functionality itself plus maintenance, bug fixing, testing, release preparations, reviews of contributed code and such alone is already a full-time job when done right, and that even leaves out other coding unrelated tasks like writing documentation, community management, server administration etc.

< p style=”text-align: left”>You guys need more explanation for Gina’s first place in the top list? I don’t think so, almost everyone voted for her in the group poll and I think that’s another success for her.

< p style=”text-align: left”>Social media contact:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/foosel
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ginahaeussge/
Website: https://foosel.net/

 You can also support Gina to continue her research and development at her Patreon page.

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5 Comments
  1. [email protected] says

    These are some amazing women. It just goes to show you females do have a place in this industry.

    1. Diana Segura says

      Everyone has a place in this industry as long as they love what they do (: thanks for comment.

  2. jvastine says

    Good article about some incredible women.

    1. Diana Segura says

      Thank you, wait for part II 😉

  3. Paarkum Mariano says

    3D Printing has a lot of benefits, specially for the artist, inventors, engineers and more… Anyone has creative mind, can use it to produce an amazing figures, blocks, learning toys for toddlers/kids, basic equipments or tools, arts, robotics parts, miniature model, and a lot more… I can see already the future of the success of 3D printing, since it will be very useful on all aspect of any fields or industry. From above they already demonstrated how awesome the 3D printing.

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