Search

3 Types of People I Hate in the 3D Printing Community

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

3 Types of People I Hate in the 3D Printing Community
3.75 (75%) 4 votes

{:en}Okay, first to explain what I mean with the term "3D Printing Fad", because it has created a lot of confusion within many of the articles I have written, and it is what I base my analysis on. I acknowledge that 3D Printing in itself is an additive manufacturing technique used for rapid prototyping. The media, however, tend to present 3D Printing as the breakthrough technology that will change the world and its functions forever. It is portrayed as a complex, mysterious, expensive, and difficult process by the mass media.

If you really think about it, mainstream media will usually report on either 3D Printing related startup companies that "aim to change the world" in one way or another, or on an exotic 3D Printer that can print buildings or glass structures. And this is causing, at least in part, the distorted public image concerning 3D printing, and the fad that accompanies it.
Many of my classmates, in fact, almost all comment that I have an extreme, complicated and expensive hobby when they want to talk (or I talk) about my 3D Printer.

There are a lot of people, firms, and startups, that are taking advantage of the image the people have created around 3D Printing. Even though anyone that is using a RepRap/Prusa printer will tell you otherwise, the image of 3D Printing as an exotic and expensive commodity is prevalent in the majority of the people.

In this essay, I want to point out and scold these people and the practices they use to trick people. Each type of person is progressively worse, in my opinion, than the previous, and the final one is the one worthy of exile.

Maybe my views on this matter differ from that of the entire community or maybe my juvenile intolerance has caused me to have such radical and audible opinions, seeing how I am only 16 years old. With that in mind, I will still write this article as I believe that there are certain facts that have to be pointed out, to maintain and strengthen the community of friendly, helpful, and passionate makers that dominate and comprise the 3D printing scene.

I want to add that this whole essay goes against my philosophy in life, called who-gives-a-shit-ism, but neither have I fully endorsed this practice yet nor will I leave these people remain un-scolded.

The ones I want to condemn are:

1. Restaurant made entirely of 3D Printed stuff

Every now and then I stumble into an article that describes an restaurant that 3D-prints all its meals. All is okay so far, nothing new for me, until I read a bit further down: "Everything is 3D Printed, from the food to the chairs to the tables" (Can't remember the direct quote and I don't have access to the article as of right now). What immediately crossed my mind, and I even left as a comment, is:

WHY?! 3D Printing is traditionally used and is cost efficient only when building a small number of small prototypes. If one wants to build 20 or more identical chairs, and 5 or more full-sized tables, it is more than stupid to 3D Print them all. It is exploitative of the image the public has formed of 3D Printing, even if this is a false use of this technology. At least make a mold out of the first print and make the rest that way. I'll let you guys scold me through comments 😉

2. People who charge way too much for garbage-quality 3D Prints.

I have already touched upon this subject in a previous article, and people responded saying that "these companies do not only charge the plastic used, you also pay for the use of the printer, the person in charge, the electricity used, and all the other expenses a legal firm has". I completely agree with this statement, there is nothing wrong with that. I even charge more than the plastic I used. But when I pay top-price, I expect top quality.

This is not the case for a friend of mine, who was sold broken parts and fairy tales by a Greek firm, that claimed that "3D Printing is a hard and risky process" and broken parts happen frequently. Don't believe me? Here are some photos of the prints below.

If you do not believe me, ask me in PM or in person. Because of legal reasons, I can disclose neither the Person's name, the company's name, or the price (s)he pay. To give a perspective though, it was about 12 times the cost of the plastic, and 6 times the price another firm offered. They exploited my friend's naivety and didn't hesitate to do so.

Aris_images
I did not alter any of these objects (ok, the dirt was not there, but all the rest are).

Do you know see what I mean? They don't even have curves or supports, they are simple extrudes. They even failed to make the fins go in the gear which was a specific request. How incompetent can one be?!

3. People who say that they "made" their own 3D Printers

(when that is total bullshit)

These people are the absolute worse. You can understand my view by how much I have written about it.

I am not talking about the people who actually design their printer from the frame to its motion, order the parts, assemble it, and test it. These people are awesome and I envy them.

But, I hate with all my spirit the people who go around and say they "made" their 3D Printers, when in fact they either downloaded STL's with instructions from sites like RepRap, or even worse ordered kit printers and assembled them. I have met some of these people up close, and I can say they are as shady as they seem.

Of course I cannot name anyone in particular, but there is this one kid that claims he built both his 3D Printer and a humanoid robot (with no direct mention of how it is an InMoov robot, whose parts, assembly instructions, and wiring instructions are available online).

These people are the scum and the shame of the 3D Printing community and should never be taken seriously by anyone. They are laughed at by the 3D Printing community, but the general public believes them and even looks up to them.

These people go against the principles of Making. They are in the same level as small children playing with Lego's; in the same level of honesty, maturity, responsibility, complexity, originality, and effort. They even use the same material for Christ's sake.

Thank god that, at least, everyone of higher authority (like STEM competition organizers) recognize their attempts to seem mightier than they truly are and do not let them deceive them. True story hiding right there.

The whole confusion originates from the use of the word "made". It is just so broad and generic that everyone uses it, but the people that want to seem mighty never specify. They say they "made" the printer, and are of no fault grammatically, but the public gets mesmerized because of what they think "made" means and includes.

I have the same problem almost every day. I sometimes print some stuff that I take to school to post-process. That is why I have either slept in or skipped many morning lessons (my grades suffered accordingly). People always ask me "did you make this?". If I designed and printed it from scratch, I proudly say "Yes". If it is a model that I downloaded off of Thingiverse, I either say: "No, I just printed it" or "yes, but only printed it, did not design it". This is the right thing to do.

Okay, this is the end of my hate speech. I will be following this up with a list of people and organizations that use 3D Printing for an ethical or all-round correct way. But for now I leave with this:

Watch out for the above three types of people. They do not deserve the respect they are given by the public, and they should at least learn what modesty means.

{:}{:es}

Bien, en primer lugar explicaré lo que quiero decir con el término "moda pasajera de impresión 3D", porque se ha creado una gran cantidad de confusión en muchos de los artículos que he escrito, y esto es en lo que baso mi análisis. Reconozco que la impresión 3D en sí misma es una técnica de fabricación de aditivos para fabricación rápida de prototipos. Los medios de comunicación, sin embargo, tienden a presentar a la impresión 3D como la tecnología de punta que va a cambiar el mundo y sus funciones para siempre. Se retrata como un proceso complejo, misterioso, caro y difícil por los medios de comunicación masiva.

Si realmente te pones a pensar en esto, los grandes medios de comunicación suelen informar sobre cualquiera de las compañías startup relacionadas con la impresión en 3D que "tienen como objetivo cambiar el mundo" de una manera u otra, o sobre una exótica impresora 3D  que puede imprimir edificios o estructuras de vidrio. Y esto está causando, al menos en parte, la imagen pública distorsionada en relación con la impresión en 3D, y la novedad que lo acompaña.

Muchos de mis compañeros de clase, de hecho, casi todos comentan que tengo un pasatiempo extremo, complicado y costoso cuando quieren hablar (o hablo) sobre mi impresora 3D.

Hay una gran cantidad de personas, empresas y startups que se están aprovechando de la imagen que las personas han creado en torno a la impresión 3D. A pesar de que cualquier persona que esté utilizando una impresora RepRap / Prusa te dirá lo contrario, la imagen de la impresión en 3D como un producto exótico y caro es frecuente en la mayoría de las personas.

En este ensayo, quiero señalar y reprender a estas personas y las prácticas que utilizan para engañar a la gente. Cada tipo de persona es progresivamente peor, en mi opinión, que la anterior, y el último es el único digno de exilio.

Tal vez mis puntos de vista sobre este asunto difieren de los de toda la comunidad, o tal vez mi intolerancia juvenil me ha causado tener opiniones tan radicales y audibles, viendo que sólo tengo 16 años de edad. Con eso en mente, aun escribiré este artículo ya que creo que hay ciertos hechos que tienen que ser puntualizados, para mantener y fortalecer la comunidad de amigables, serviciales, y apasionados makers que dominan y conforman la escena de la impresión 3D.

Quiero añadir que todo este ensayo va en contra de mi filosofía de vida, llamada a-quién-mierdas-le-importa, aunque tampoco me he apoyado plenamente esta práctica, sin embargo no voy a dejar que estas personas permanezcan sin regaño.

Aquellos a los que quiero condenar son:

1. Restaurante hecho de material impreso en 3D

De vez en cuando me tropiezo en un artículo que describe un restaurante 3D que: imprime todas sus comidas. Todo está bien hasta el momento, nada nuevo para mí, hasta que leí un poco más abajo: "Todo es impreso en 3D, desde la comida hasta las sillas y mesas" (no recuerdo la cita exacta y no tengo acceso el artículo a partir de ahora). Lo que cruzó mi mente de inmediato, e incluso dejé como un comentario, es:

¡¿POR QUÉ?! La impresión 3D se utiliza tradicionalmente y es rentable sólo cuando se trata de construir un pequeño número de pequeños prototipos. Si se quiere construir 20 o más sillas idénticas, y 5 o más mesas del mismo tamaño, es más que estúpido imprimirlas todas. Es la explotación de la imagen que el público se ha formado de la impresión en 3D, incluso si se trata de un uso falso de esta tecnología. Por lo menos haz un molde de la primera impresión y haz el resto de esa manera. Voy a dejar que ustedes chicos me regañen a través de los comentarios 😉

2. Las personas que cobran demasiado por calidad de basura en sus impresiones 3D.

Ya he tocado este tema en un artículo anterior, y la gente respondió diciendo que "estas empresas no sólo cobran el plástico utilizado, también pagas por el uso de la impresora, la persona a cargo, la electricidad utilizada, y todos los otros gastos que la firma legal tenga". Estoy totalmente de acuerdo con esta declaración, no hay nada malo en ello. Incluso me cobran más que el plástico que he usado. Pero cuando pago un alto precio, espero primera calidad.

Este no es el caso de un amigo mío, al que le fueron vendidas piezas rotas y los cuentos por una empresa griega, que afirmó que "la impresión 3D es un proceso difícil y arriesgado" y las partes rotas ocurren con frecuencia. ¿No me creen? Aquí están algunas fotos de las impresiones abajo.

Si no me crees, me pregúntame en un mensaje privado o en persona. Debido a razones legales, no puedo revelar el nombre de la persona, ni el nombre de la empresa, o el precio que él/ella pagó. Para dar una perspectiva, sin embargo, fue alrededor de 12 veces el costo del plástico, y 6 veces el precio ofrecido por otra firma. Ellos explotaron la ingenuidad de mi amigo y no dudaron en hacerlo.

Si no me crees, me pregúntame en un mensaje privado o en persona. Debido a razones legales, no puedo revelar el nombre de la persona, ni el nombre de la empresa, o el precio que él/ella pagó. Para dar una perspectiva, sin embargo, fue alrededor de 12 veces el costo del plástico, y 6 veces el precio ofrecido por otra firma. Ellos explotaron la ingenuidad de mi amigo y no dudaron en hacerlo.

Aris_images
No alteré ninguno de estos objetos (bueno, la tierra no estaba allí, pero todo el resto sí).

¿Sabes lo que quiero decir? estas ni siquiera tienen curvas o soportes, son extrusiones simples. Incluso no pudieron hacer que las aletas vayan en la marcha, la cual fue una petición específica. ¡¿Qué tan incompetente se puede ser?

3. Las personas que dicen que "hicieron" sus propias impresoras 3D

(Cuando esto es una mierda total)

No estoy hablando de las personas que realmente diseñan su impresora desde la trama a su movimiento, ordenan las partes, las ensamblan y prueban. Estas personas son asombrosas y las envidio.

Pero, odio con todo mi espíritu a las personas que andan por ahí diciendo que "hicieron" sus impresoras 3D, cuando en realidad they either descargaron STL’s con instrucciones de sitios como RepRap, o incluso peor, ordenaron un kit de impresoras y las ensamblaron. He conocido a algunas de estas personas de cerca, y puedo decir que son tan turbios como parecen.

Estas personas son absolutamente de lo peor. Se puede entender mi punto de vista por lo mucho que he escrito sobre ello.

Por supuesto que no puedo nombrar a nadie en particular, pero esta ese niño que afirma que construyó tanto su impresora 3D como  un robot humanoide (sin mencionar directamente que se trata de un robot InMoov, cuyas partes, instrucciones de montaje y las instrucciones de cableado se muestran disponibles vía online).

Estas personas son la escoria y la vergüenza de la comunidad de impresión en 3D y nunca deberían ser tomados en serio por nadie. Se rieron de la comunidad de impresión 3D, pero el público en general les cree, e incluso les ponen atención.

Gracias a Dios que, al menos, todas las autoridades superiores (como los organizadores de la competencia STEM) reconocen sus intentos de parecer más poderosos de lo que realmente son y no dejan que los engañen. La verdadera historia oculta allí mismo.

Toda la confusión se origina en el uso de la palabra "hecho". Es tan amplia y genérica que todo el mundo la utiliza, pero las personas que quieren parecer poderosas nunca la usan bien. Dicen que "hacen" la impresora, y no tienen error gramatical alguno, pero el público queda hipnotizado por lo que ellos piensan que "hecho" significa e implica.

Bien, este es el final de mi discurso de odio. Continuaré esto con una lista de personas y organizaciones que utilizan la impresión 3D de una forma correcta ética o todos los aspectos. Pero por ahora les dejo con esto:

Tengo el mismo problema casi todos los días. A veces imprimo algunas cosas que llevo a la escuela para un post-procesarlas. Es por eso que me he dormido ahí o me he saltado muchas clases de la mañana (mis calificaciones sufrieron en consecuencia). La gente siempre me pregunta "¿hiciste esto?". Si lo he diseñado e impreso a partir de cero, con orgullo digo "Sí". Si se trata de un modelo que he descargado de Thingiverse, en cualquier caso digo: "No, sólo imprimí" o "sí, pero sólo lo imprimí, no lo diseñé". Esto es lo que hay que hacer.

Bien, este es el final de mi discurso de odio. Continuaré esto con una lista de personas y organizaciones que utilizan la impresión 3D de una forma correcta ética o todos los aspectos. Pero por ahora les dejo con esto:

Cuidado con los anteriores tres tipos de personas. No merecen el respeto que se les da por el público, y por lo menos deberían aprender lo que significa modestia.

{:}


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Profile photo of Nick Kalogeropoulos

Written by 

I am a high school student from Athens, and I have been practicing 3D Design and 3D Printing for 3 years now. I am excited to see how far this technology can go for a casual but passionate maker.

Related posts

3 thoughts on “3 Types of People I Hate in the 3D Printing Community

  1. We are all kids playing with Legos, but some of us have been playing longer than others, and moved up to more complex, more expensive Legos. Everyone stands on the shoulders of giants, so to speak. You wouldn’t throw a steak in a chef’s face just because he didn’t grow the cow himself.

  2. I can see why some of these thing could be aggravating, but, at my age I’ve learned to try to use my energies in constructive ways…but, I enjoyed your article and hope to read more in the future!!!

  3. Really interesting article. kind of had to vent there. You are young and will learn in life it is easier to surround yourself with like minded people and pay only half the attention the rest of them.

Leave a Comment