Search

How small can you print? 7 tiniest 3D prints that you can imagine

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

How small can you print? 7 tiniest 3D prints that you can imagine
3.67 (73.33%) 3 votes

{:en}Do you always need a cap to hide hair fall? Does you car get easily affected by wear and tear? Do you want to travel inside your computer? 3D printing might help you.

The 3D printers which we use always have a minimum structural size that can be printed. But research and exploration in the field has led to rapid development of technologies that can print objects in micro and nano scales. Such dimensions mean that the object is hardly visible to naked eyes. Here is a collection of such tiny 3D prints to make you blink your eyes twice.


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

The lost sculptures
London-based artist Jonty Hurwitz created a series of nanoscale 3D sculptures. Capturing 3D renderings of models posing for his sculptures, he got them printed with a Nanoscribe 3D printer. They were that tiny that he had to use an electron microscope to view his prints. At 80 x 100 x 20 microns, his sculpture also got into 2015 Guinness World Record for “The smallest sculpture of a human form”.

TRUST - The nano sculpture Source: Jontyhurwitz
TRUST - The nano sculpture
Source: Jontyhurwitz

But the peculiarity is that he just lost his sculptures after observing their beauty. The slide containing the sculptures was taken out from the electron microscope from one of its engineers, only to realise that they will never find the sculptures again. Nevertheless, the majestic images of the masterpiece stand out to symbolise integration of art with engineering.

New age of spycams
A tiny lens of 100 microns diameter has been printed by scientists at University of Stuttgart, Germany. This enables development of tiny image capturing devices to be used in robotics, surveillance and medicine. They combined three of these lenses to form a ‘pinhead’ device, which can be printed over tip of endoscopes, digital cameras, image sensors or optical fibres. Dr. Timo Gissibl and his colleagues in their paper wrote, “The unprecedented flexibility of our method paves the way towards printed optical miniature instruments such as endoscopes, fibre-imaging systems for cell biology, new illumination systems, miniature optical fibre traps, integrated quantum emitters and detectors, and miniature drones and robots with autonomous vision.” A new tool for the next James Bond?

3D printed 'pinhead' Source: Nature Photonics
3D printed 'pinhead'
Source: Nature Photonics


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Who said hair only grows naturally
Using a normal 3D printer, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have invented a way to produce hair-like strands, fibres and bristles. They achieved this by moving the print head and object holding the strands sidewise rapidly, so that thin bristle-like structures can be extruded. Using PLA filaments in different colour, they made multi-coloured shock of hair for fantasy creatures. With no special dedicated hardware attachments, it is clear that such thin delicate structures can be printed with the correct calibration of parameters.

Hair printing
Hair printing
Source: The Tartan

But how to slice the hair?
We just saw that hair-like structures can be 3D printed. But the conventional slicing software would not be able to generate a reliable slicing algorithm for such a structure. Hence comes a slicing software called Cilllia, developed by researchers from MIT. The number, density, and size of hairs can be chosen along with the required level of rigidity. They demonstrated the software by printing varying types of hairs of rabbits, hedgehogs, paintbrushes, velcro, etc. They plan to refine the technology and research on identifying means to print on more angular surfaces, which means, it would simulate a human head!

Spiky and soft hair
Spiky and soft hair
Source: MIT


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Micro-drill machine
Lance Abernethy, a maintenance engineer from New Zealand, has built the world’s smallest drilling machine. Using his Ultimaker 2 3D printer after designing in Onshape 3D CAD software, he built the machine of dimensions 13mm length, 7.5mm width and 17mm height. The best part is the twist drill bit, of 0.5mm diameter. Powered using a hearing aid battery and a miniature motor, and wired using a headphone cable, the machine just gets into work to drill miniature holes on soft materials. More such tiny machines are sure to be in his pipeline.

Abernathy's drilling machine
Abernathy's drilling machine
Source: 3Dprint

Miniature mountains
Researchers at Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland have 3D printed Matterhorn mountains, one of the highest mountains in Europe. Each of these mountains is less than a tenth of a millimetre, simulating the actual 4478 metres mountain range. They demonstrate that such kind of pyramidal structures have technical importance as well. It would reduce a component’s wear and tear during its functional usage. Using the technology called two-photon lithography, further production of such arbitrary complex shaped details with combined technical and aesthetic appeal can be expected.

Matterhorn mountain
Matterhorn mountain
Source: PSI


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

3D micro spirals
A new method to print tiny, partly overhanging parts in a single step is developed by the researchers at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Built without support structures or templates even for overhanging , these miniature parts could be used in surgery tools and precision instruments. Luca Hirt, a doctoral student of the university, has developed this technique in which the print head can print even sideways, thereby eliminating the requirement of templates.

Copper micro spiral Source: ETH Zurich
Copper micro spiral
Source: ETH Zurich

The object is printed pixel by pixel and layer by layer, mainly made of copper deposits. A pixel ranges from 800 nanometres to over 5 micrometres, and these individual pixels are fused together to form larger sized objects.

Thus it is evident that 3D printing revolutionises the miniature manufacturing world, not only in terms printing objects for art and fun, but also in technical operations and medical advances. Let's expect more innovations and developments in other unexplored fields in future.

amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0";
amzn_assoc_enable_interest_ads = "true";
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "3dpc06-20";
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "auto";
amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart";
amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon";
amzn_assoc_region = "US";
amzn_assoc_linkid = "425fd1fc08b83bf84a0cd22b36feabb6";
amzn_assoc_fallback_mode = {"type":"search","value":"filament"};
amzn_assoc_default_category = "Industrial";{:}{:es}¿Necesitas siempre de una gorra para ocultar la caída del cabello? ¿Tu coche se ve fácilmente afectado por el desgaste? ¿Quieres viajar dentro de tu computadora? La impresión en 3D podría ayudarte.
Las impresoras 3D que utilizamos siempre tienen un tamaño estructural mínimo que se puede imprimir. Sin embargo, la investigación y la exploración en el campo ha dado lugar a un rápido desarrollo de tecnologías que pueden imprimir objetos en escalas micro y nano. Tales dimensiones hacen que el objeto sea apenas visible a simple vista. Aquí una colección de tales impresiones 3D  tan minúsculas que harán parpadear a tus ojos dos veces.


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Las esculturas perdidas

El artista con sede en Londres Jonty Hurwitz creó una serie de esculturas en 3D a escala nanométrica. La captura de las representaciones en 3D de modelos posando para sus esculturas, las fabrico con una impresora 3D Nanoscribe. Fueron tan pequeñas que tenía que utilizar un microscopio electrónico para ver sus impresiones. A 80 x 100 x 20 micras, su escultura también consiguió en 2015 el récord Guinness mundial para "La escultura más pequeña de una forma humana".

TRUST - The nano sculpture Source: Jontyhurwitz
TRUST - La nano escultura
Fuente: Jontyhurwitz

 

Sin embargo, la peculiaridad es que perdió sus esculturas apenas después de observar su belleza. La diapositiva que contiene las esculturas fue tomada del microscopio electrónico por uno de sus ingenieros, sólo para darse cuenta de que nunca encontrarán las esculturas de nuevo. No obstante, las majestuosas imágenes de la obra maestra destacan como símbolo de integración del arte con la ingeniería.

 

La nueva era de cámaras espía

Una pequeña lente de 100 micras de diámetro ha sido impresa por científicos de la Universidad de Stuttgart, Alemania. Esto permite el desarrollo de dispositivos de captura de imágenes pequeñas para ser utilizadas en la robótica, la vigilancia y la medicina. Ellos combinaron tres de estas lentes para formar un dispositivo de "cabeza de alfiler ', que se puede imprimir sobre la punta de los endoscopios, cámaras digitales, sensores de imagen o fibras ópticas. El Dr. Timo Gissibl y sus colegas escribieron en su artículo, "La flexibilidad sin precedentes de nuestro método allana el camino hacia instrumentos ópticos impresos en miniatura, tales como endoscopios, sistemas de fibra de imagen para la biología celular, nuevos sistemas de iluminación, trampas de fibra óptica en miniatura, emisores cuánticos integrados y detectores, y drones no tripulados en miniatura y robots con visión autónoma". ¿Una nueva herramienta para el próximo James Bond?

3D printed 'pinhead' Source: Nature Photonics
Pinhead impreso en 3D
Fuente: Nature Photonics


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

¿Quién dijo que el pelo sólo crece de forma natural?
Usando una impresora 3D normal, investigadores de la Universidad Carnegie Mellon han inventado una manera de producir hebras similares a pelos, fibras y cerdas. Ellos lograron esto mediante el movimiento del cabezal de impresión y sosteniendo los hilos de lado rápidamente, por lo que estructuras en forma de pelos finos pueden ser extruidas. Usando filamentos de PLA en diferentes colores, hicieron un mechón de pelo multicolor para criaturas de fantasía. Sin dispositivos especiales de hardware dedicado, es evidente que este tipo de delicadas estructuras finas se pueden imprimir con la correcta calibración de parámetros.

Hair printing
Imprimiendo cabello 
Fuente: The Tartan

 

Pero, ¿cómo cortar el pelo?

Acabamos de ver que estructuras similares a cabellos pueden ser impresas en 3D. Sin embargo, el software de corte convencional no sería capaz de generar un algoritmo de corte fiable para una estructura de este tipo. De ahí viene un software de corte llamado Cilllia, desarrollado por investigadores del MIT. El número, densidad y tamaño de los pelos pueden ser elegidos junto con el nivel requerido de rigidez. Probaron el software mediante la impresión de diferentes tipos de pelos de conejos, erizos, pinceles, velcro, etc. Ellos planean refinar la tecnología y la investigación en la identificación de medios para imprimir en superficies más angulares, lo que significa que, ¡simularía una cabeza humana!

Spiky and soft hair
Cabello corto y largo
Fuente: MIT


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Micro-taladro

Lance Abernethy, un ingeniero de mantenimiento proveniente de Nueva Zelanda, ha construido el taladro más pequeño del mundo. Haciendo uso de su impresora 3D Ultimaker 2 después de diseñar el software  CAD 3D Onshape, construyó la máquina con dimensiones de 13 mm de longitud, 7,5 mm de anchura y 17 mm de altura. La mejor parte es la broca helicoidal, de 0,5 mm de diámetro. Funciona con una pila de audífono y un motor en miniatura, y conectada a través de un cable de auriculares, la máquina sólo se pone a trabajar para perforar agujeros en miniatura en materiales blandos. Más de dichas máquinas diminutas seguramente se encuentran en su proyecto.

Abernathy's drilling machine
taladro de Abernathy's 
Fuente: 3Dprint


M
ontañas miniatura

Investigadores en el Instituto Paul Scherrer de Suiza han impreso las montañas Matterhorn en 3D, una de las montañas más altas de Europa. Cada una de estas montañas mide menos de una décima de milímetro, simulando el alcance real de la montaña de 4478 metros. Ellos demuestran que este tipo de estructuras piramidales tiene importancia técnica también. Reduciría el desgaste de un componente durante su uso funcional. Usando la tecnología llamada two-photon lithography, aunado a la producción de tales detalles de formas complejas arbitrarias con la combinación de atractivo técnico y estético pueden esperarse.

 

Matterhorn mountain
Montaña Matterhorn
Fuente: PSI


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Micro espirales 3D
Un nuevo método para imprimir minúsculas piezas que sobresalen por partes en un solo paso es desarrollado por los investigadores de ETH Zurich, Suiza. Construido sin estructuras de soporte o plantillas incluso para colgantes, estas piezas en miniatura podrían ser utilizadas en equipos de cirugía e instrumentos de precisión. Luca Hirt, un estudiante de doctorado de la Universidad, ha desarrollado esta técnica en la que el cabezal de impresión puede imprimir incluso hacia los lados, lo que se elimina el requisito de plantillas.

Copper micro spiral Source: ETH Zurich
Cobre micro espiral 
Fuente: ETH Zurich

El objeto se imprime pixel por pixel y capa por capa, compuesto principalmente de depósitos de cobre. Un píxel varía de 800 nanómetros a más de 5 micrómetros, y estos píxeles individuales se fusionan entre sí para formar objetos de mayor tamaño.
Por lo tanto, es evidente que la impresión 3D revoluciona el mundo de fabricación en miniatura, no sólo en cuanto a la impresión de objetos de arte y diversión, sino también en las operaciones técnicas y los avances médicos. Esperemos más innovaciones y desarrollos en otras áreas no exploradas en el futuro.

amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0";
amzn_assoc_enable_interest_ads = "true";
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "3dpc06-20";
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "auto";
amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart";
amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon";
amzn_assoc_region = "US";
amzn_assoc_linkid = "425fd1fc08b83bf84a0cd22b36feabb6";
amzn_assoc_fallback_mode = {"type":"search","value":"filament"};
amzn_assoc_default_category = "Industrial";

{:}


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Written by 

Engineer and 3D printing enthusiast, experimenting with technologies and materials associated with additive manufacturing

Related posts

Leave a Comment