Arduino Part–2 The Choices Entry Level

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Arduino Part–2 The Choices Entry Level
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So you have read part one and curious to find out what there is out there to use.

I am going to try and keep this as current as possible with some history thrown in

I will publish a list of types and specifications and possible uses for each one.

Once we have this I will select a few for some new posts with projects to 3D print and code.

This is where it gets all a bit technical – so buckle up and get ready for an information overload.

Along with all the arduino’s there are a raft of shields (extra board for specific jobs that attach and enhance the arduinos)

So firstly we need to categorise them as follows

Entry Level

Arduino Uno

ArdGen_UNO

Microprocessor ATMega328p

Operating Voltage 5V

Input Voltage(Recommended) 7-12v

Input Voltage limit 6-20v

Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)

PWM Digital I/O Pins 6

Analog Input Pins 6

DC Current per I/O Pin 20 mA

DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA

Flash Memory 32 KB (ATmega328P)
of which 0.5 KB used by bootloader

SRAM 2 KB (ATmega328P)

EEPROM 1 KB (ATmega328P)

Clock Speed 16 MHz

Length 68.6 mm

Width 53.4 mm

Weight 25 g

Possible Projects

CNC Controller , Weather Station , Robots
Arduino  101

101

Microcontroller Intel Curie

Operating Voltage 3.3V (5V tolerant I/O)

Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V

Input Voltage (limit) 7-20V

Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 4 provide PWM output)

PWM Digital I/O Pins 4
Analog Input Pins 6

DC Current per I/O Pin 20 mA

Flash Memory 196 kB

SRAM 24 kB

Clock Speed 32MHz

Features Bluetooth LE, 6-axis accelerometer/gyro

Length 68.6 mm

Width 53.4 mm

Possible Projects

Arduino 101 & Genuino 101 combine the ease-of-use of the classic boards with the latest technologies. The board recognises gestures, and features a six-axis accelerometer and gyroscope. Control your projects with your phone over Bluetooth connectivit

Arduino Pro

ArduinoPro

Microcontroller ATmega168 or ATmega328

Operating Voltage 3.3V or 5V

Input Voltage 3.35 -12 V (3.3V versions) or 5 – 12 V (5V versions)

Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)

Analog Input Pins 6

DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA

Flash Memory 16 KB (ATmega168) or 32KB (ATmega328) of which 2 KB used by bootloader

SRAM 1 KB (ATmega168) or 2 KB (ATmega328)

EEPROM 512 bytes (ATmega168) or 1 KB (ATmega328)

Clock Speed 8 MHz (3.3V versions) or 16 MHz (5V versions)

Possible Projects

The Arduino Pro is intended for semi-permanent installation in objects or exhibitions. The board comes without pre-mounted headers, allowing the use of various types of connectors or direct soldering of wires. The pin layout is compatible with Arduino shields. The 3.3V versions of the Pro can be powered with a battery.

Arduino Pro Mini

ArduinoProMini_Back_3v3

ArduinoProMini_Front_3v3

Microcontroller ATmega328

Operating Voltage 3.3V or 5V (depending on model)

Input Voltage 3.35 -12 V (3.3V model) or 5 – 12 V (5V model)

Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)

Analog Input Pins 6

DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA

Flash Memory 32 kB (of which 0.5 kB used by bootloader)

SRAM 2 kB

EEPROM 1 kB

Clock Speed 8 MHz (3.3V model) or 16 MHz (5V model)

Possible Projects

The Arduino Pro Mini is intended for semi-permanent installation in objects or exhibitions. The board comes without pre-mounted headers, allowing the use of various types of connectors or direct soldering of wires. The pin layout is compatible with the Arduino Mini.

There are two version of the Pro Mini. One runs at 3.3V and 8 MHz, the other at 5V and 16 MHz.

Arduino Micro

ArdGen_Micro1

Microcontroller ATmega32U4

Operating Voltage 5V

Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V

Input Voltage (limit) 6-20V

Digital I/O Pins 20

PWM Channels 7

Analog Input Channels 12

DC Current per I/O Pin 20 mA

DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA

Flash Memory 32 KB (ATmega32U4) of which 4 KB used by bootloader

SRAM 2.5 KB (ATmega32U4)

EEPROM 1 KB (ATmega32U4)

Clock Speed 16 MHz

Length 48 mm

Width 18 mm

Weight 13 g

Possible  Projects

The Micro is the smallest board of the family, easy to integrate it in everyday objects to make them interactive. The Micro is based on the ATmega32U4 microcontroller featuring a built-in USB which makes the Micro recognisable as a mouse or keyboard

Arduino Nano

ArduinoNanoFront_3_sm

ArduinoNanoBack_3_sm

Microcontroller Atmel ATmega168 or ATmega328

Operating Voltage (logic level) 5 V

Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12 V

Input Voltage (limits) 6-20 V

Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)

Analog Input Pins 8

DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA

Flash Memory 16 KB (ATmega168) or 32 KB (ATmega328) of which 2 KB used by bootloader

SRAM 1 KB (ATmega168) or 2 KB (ATmega328)

EEPROM 512 bytes (ATmega168) or 1 KB (ATmega328)

Clock Speed 16 MHz

Dimensions 0.73″ x 1.70″

Length 45 mm

Width 18 mm

Weight 5 g

Possible projects

The one I have made is a 3d scanner which will be the subject of another blog.

Arduino Motor Shield

MotorShield_R3_Front_450px

MotorShield_R3_Back_450px

The Arduino Motor Shield is based on the L298 (datasheet), which is a dual full-bridge driver designed to drive inductive loads such as relays, solenoids, DC and stepping motors. It lets you drive two DC motors with your Arduino board, controlling the speed and direction of each one independently. You can also measure the motor current absorption of each motor, among other features. The shield is TinkerKit compatible, which means you can quickly create projects by plugging TinkerKit modules to the board.

Operating Voltage 5V to 12V

Motor controller L298P, Drives 2 DC motors or 1 stepper motor

Max current 2A per channel or 4A max (with external power supply)

Current sensing 1.65V/A

Free running stop and brake function

Possible projects

Anything that you would like with motors , robots,cnc machines etc.

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